Racial and Cultural Mental Health Disparities, Early Psychosis, and the Effects of COVID-19 on Mental Health
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Availability
On-Demand
Expires on May 03, 2025
Credit Offered
1 CME Credit
1 Psych CE Credit
1 SW CE Credit
1 COP Credit

It is important that every population feels that they have access for receiving proper mental health care and treatment in support of their mental and emotional wellbeing. This is especially crucial when there is a behavioral health problem. At the time of this writing, there have been several minorities suffering from acute mental health crises (namely psychosis) killed by local law enforcement. There are several minority populations within the U.S. who habitually fail to receive proper access, treatment and quality mental health care service because of their race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or other discriminatory reasons. African Americans, Latinos, American Indians/Alaska Native, and Asian Americans are the most vulnerable populations at risk of experiencing a mental health disorder (APA, 2017). Research over the years has found that there are differences in mental health care disparities for each racial and ethnic minority population depending on their background.

When the mental health care services are specialized for understanding minorities, it is likely that their mental health recovery rates will increase with less occurrences of dropouts in recovery programs. Many of the barriers that exist for general mental health care are the same factors which prevent minorities for having access to early psychosis care. Yet, to understand the exact initiatives that should be taken to promote better care for minorities who are experiencing early psychosis is still fully unknown, more longitudinal and qualitative research is needed to better determine those factors. Disparities that existed before COVID-19 are still in effect but with even more barriers because of higher rates of unemployment, evictions, and insecurity, which has made many minorities more vulnerable for getting sick and dying from COVID-19 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2020).

While many minorities experience a life of poverty and the lack of mental health care access, the two issues are interrelated in they both decrease the quality of life and increase outcomes and risks. The goal of this session is to address the ongoing and prominent issue of racial and cultural disparities for minorities in receiving mental health care services in the U.S. by discussing the struggles of racial and cultural backgrounds, barriers to care, access to treatment, and the probable solutions for overcoming disparity. Behavioral health disparities refer to the elements that are restricted or minimized in the form of barriers to treatment and access for receiving proper mental health care which will be exemplified more in the session. The topic of early psychosis and how it effects minority groups and the barriers involved for receiving care for early psychosis will also be addressed. This session will also include information on the effects of COVID-19 on mental health.

Format

Recorded webinar, non-interactive, self-paced distance learning activity with post-test.

This presentation was recorded on November 12, 2020 at the virtual conference, Third National Conference on Advancing Early Psychosis Care in the United States: Addressing Inequities - Race, Culture, and COVID. 

Learning Objectives

  • Explain the role that lack of financial resources, discrimination and inequalities play in increasing poor health outcomes for minorities.
  • Discuss the role of early intervention in improving outcomes in minority populations.
  • Discuss ways that proper intervention by law enforcement may lead to better strategies in early psychosis.

Outline

  • Racial and ethnic minorities: History and health disparities.
  • First Episode Psychosis: Stigma, criminal justice system, and COVID-19.
  • Solutions to improve mental health disparities.
  • Discuss how COVID-19 complicates the treatment of mental illness.

Target Audience

Psychologists, Social Workers, and Other Mental Health Professionals

Instructional Level

Introductory, Intermediate

Estimate Time to Complete

Estimated Duration: 1.0 hour
Program Start Date: May 3, 2024
Program End Date: May 3, 2025

How to Earn Credit

Participants who wish to earn AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™, CE credit for psychologists, CE credit for social workers, or a certificate of participation may do so by completing all sections of the course, including viewing the full video (≥60 minutes) and submitting an evaluation. A multiple-choice quiz is provided based on the content. A passing score of 75% must be achieved. After evaluating the program, course participants will be provided with an opportunity to claim hours of participation and print an official CME certificate (physicians), CE certificate (psychologists), CE certificate (social workers), or certificate of participation (other disciplines) showing the completion date and hours/credits earned.

Continuing Education Credit

The American Psychiatric Association (APA) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Physicians

The APA designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Psychologists

The American Psychiatric Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. American Psychiatric Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Social Workers 

American Psychiatric Association, provider #1743, is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved as ACE providers. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit. American Psychiatric Association maintains responsibility for this course. ACE provider approval period: 05/18/2020 – 05/18/2021 and 05/18/2021-05/18/2024. Social workers completing this course receive 1.0 (clinical) continuing education credits.

Continuing education requirements vary from state to state. Many state boards grant reciprocity with national accrediting organizations and other state boards. It is the responsibility of each professional to understand the requirements for license renewal or check with the state or national licensing board and/or professional organization to become more familiar with their policies for acceptable continuing education credit. Social workers and Psychologists should contact their regulatory board to determine course approval.

Faculty and Planner Disclosures

Instructors

  • Maxie L. Gordon, MD completed medical school in Nashville, Tennessee and a combined psychiatry and internal medicine residency in Greenville, North Carolina, where he served as assistant professor and founding director of the medicine/ psychiatry unit. Dr. Gordon moved to Mississippi where he served as a National Health Service Corps scholar. He later joined the faculty of the University of Mississippi. There, he became Associate Professor and Director of Medical Student Education. Dr. Gordon is experienced in both institutional and community psychiatry, where he works as an activist. He reads and speaks widely on health disparities and has a weekly radio show. He has been awarded for teaching and community service. He is board certified. Disclosures - Speakers' Bureau: Neurocrine, Janssen, Alkermes, Sunovion, Intra cellular.

Program Planners

  • Steven Adelsheim, M.D. Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Catherine Adams, L.M.S.W., A.C.S.W., C.A.A.D.C. Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Susan T. Azrin, Ph.D.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Iruma Bello, Ph.D.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Gary Michael Blau, M.S., Ph.D.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Teri S. Brister, Ph.D., L.P.C.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Nybelle An-Vi Caruso, B.S.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Amy N. Cohen, Ph.D.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Robert O. Cotes, M.D.  Dr. Cotes discloses the following relationships: Consultant: Saladax Biomedical, American Psychiatric Association Grant/Research: Ostuka, Lundbeck, Roche, Alkermes
  • Judith Dauberman, M.A., Ph.D.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Steven P. Dettwyler, Ph.D.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Lisa B. Dixon, M.D., M.P.H.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Melissa Edmondson Smith, Ph.D.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Chantel Garrett. Ms. Garrett discloses the following relationships: Stock: Invitae, stockholder Livongo, stockholder Color, private equity holder Consultant: Maine Health Northwell Health One Mind Grant/Research: One Mind National Institute of Health
  • Tristan Gorrindo, M.D.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Kate Hardy, ClinPsych.D.  Ms. Hardy discloses the following relationships: Consultant: SME for Click Therapeutics
  • Robert K. Heinssen, Ph.D., A.B.P.P. Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Brian Hepburn, M.D.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Patrick Kaufmann, B.S.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Sherin Khan, L.C.S.W. Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Steven R. Lopez, Ph.D. Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Ted Lutterman.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Tushita Mayanil, M.D.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Ryan Melton, Ph.D.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Oladunni Oluwoye , Ph.D.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • Abram Rosenblatt, Ph.D.  Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests.
  • David L. Shern, Ph.D.  Dr. Shern discloses the following relationships: Grant/Research: Through my employment at NASMHPD, I co-chair the dissemination function of the Early Psychosis Intervention network as part of the national data coordinating center at Westat. Westat was awarded the coordinating center grant by NIMH Other: serve on the Board of Livanta
Reviewers
  • Teri Brister, PhD, LPC, National Alliance on Mental Illness. Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests. (Reviewed on 4/23/2024)
  • John Torous, MD, MBI, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests. (Reviewed on 4/23/2024
  • Amy N. Cohen, Ph.D, American Psychiatric Association. Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests. (Reviewed on 4/23/2024)
  • Sherin Khan, LCSW, Thresholds. Reports no financial relationships with commercial interests. (Reviewed on 4/23/2024)

Accessibility for Participants with Disabilities

The American Psychiatric Association is committed to ensuring accessibility of its website to people with disabilities. If you have trouble accessing any of APA’s online resources, please contact us at 202-559-3900 for assistance.

Technical Requirements

This internet-based CME activity is best experienced using any of the following:

  • The latest and 2nd latest public versions of Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, or Safari
  • Internet Explorer 11+

This website requires that JavaScript and session cookies be enabled. Certain activities may require additional software to view multimedia, presentation, or printable versions of the content. These activities will be marked as such and will provide links to the required software. That software may be:  Adobe Acrobat Reader, Microsoft PowerPoint, and Windows Media Player.

Optimal System Configuration:

  • Browser: Google Chrome (latest and 2nd latest version), Safari (latest and 2nd latest version), Internet Explorer 11.0+, Firefox (latest and 2nd latest version), or Microsoft Edge (latest and 2nd latest version)
  • Operating System: Windows versions 8.1+, Mac OS X 10.5 (Leopard) +, Android (latest and 2nd latest version), or iOS/iPad OS (latest and 2nd latest version)
  • Internet Connection: 1 Mbps or higher

Minimum Requirements:

  • Windows PC: Windows 8.1 or higher; 1 GB (for 32-bit)/2 GB (for 64-bit) or higher RAM; Microsoft DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM driver; audio playback with speakers for programs with video content
  • Macintosh: Mac OS X 10.5 or higher with latest updates installed; Intel, PowerPC G5, or PowerPC G4 (867MHz or faster) processor; 512 MB or higher RAM; audio playback with speakers for programs with video content

For assistance: Contact educme@psych.org for questions about this activity | Contact SMIadviserhelp@psych.org for technical assistance

Funding for SMI Adviser was made possible by Grant No. SM080818 from SAMHSA of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement by, SAMHSA/HHS or the U.S. Government.
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